Recipes

  • Making Coffee Kombucha - Not Wrong, Just Not Right

     

    Long speculated upon and feared even in anecdotes, a week ago I had the perfect opportunity to embark upon the storied nostrum that is... komffee? Coffbucha? Joebucha? Coffee kombucha. Perfect...

     

    Coffee kombucha Making coffee kombucha; after 6 days of primary fermentation

    While open-minded, I didn't think there was any way this could be tasty. Enough people had asked about it, rumors circulated, and it came to the point that this brew couldn't be avoided; of this fact the new office-tap acquisition of Stumptown cold-brewed coffee was the ultimate indicator.

     

    So, I opened up the tap, poured 32 ounces of the polarizing blackness, and added 1/4 cup of sugar to the joe after warming it on the stove. I added a bit of SCOBY, some distilled white vinegar as a starter (1 tbsp), cringed, covered and dated the jar, and set it out to ferment.

     

    After 6 days in primary fermentation, there was a pretty gnarly SCOBY growing:

     

    SCOBY of Coffee SCOBY of coffee

    Having a pretty adventurous palate still does not issue into passive consumption. The creation of what essentially is sour coffee made me reticent to attempt making this beast, though I'd thought about it many times before.

     

    Well, I wasn't proven wrong. Sour, acidic, vinegary coffee was the result - I considered the brew complete when I saw the SCOBY and smelled it - pretty awful, on both fronts. I let a couple of people in the office try it before me, still highly skeptical and protective of my taste buds' fortitude.

     

    KBBK employees investigating the coffee 'buch KBBK employees investigating the coffee 'buch

     

    The result of our tasting left us sure that the experiment had worked - coffee kombucha was assuredly the result - but in no way could this be construed by any of us as being something drinkable. Even the small cup we poured and passed around went unfinished.

     

    I bottled it, so as to preserve the train wreck that would in the future be sure to elicit fascination and disgust among unsuspecting subjects - a little carbonation should attract a completely new level of repulsion. Kind of like the time I made apricot-peppermint kombucha.

     

    *We did discover the SCOBY created from this brew was much more palatable than the brew itself.

     

     

     

    This experiment behind me, I look forward to better and brighter days. I will try not to forget what happened, only the taste. Be skeptical. It's not wrong, just not right.

     

    SCOBY can't live on beans alone SCOBY can't live on beans alone

     

  • Cooking with Kombucha: Bananas Brûlée with Mulberry Kombucha and Toasted Hazelnuts

     

     

    Cooking with Kombucha: Banana's Brûlée with Mulberry Kombucha

    This dish is fast becoming one of my favorite Cooking with Kombucha dishes. I first made it for Eric and Jessica Childs for their Kombucha! book launch at Book Court, back in November of 2013. It was really my first experience cooking with kombucha! I decided to revert to this recipe today, as it is the season for such light but really indulgent dishes. Texturally, its a delight. The banana is creamy maybe with a hint of starch, the burnt sugar and toasted hazelnuts good and crunchy, and the reduction permeates everything with a slightly cleansing astringency.

    Time needed: 30-45min

    Equipment needed:

    1 sharp, small knife and cutting board

    1 brûlée torch or other blowtorch

    1 hand-crafted banana leaf platter by Brooklyn artist Georgea Snyder; or something else presentable

    an oven, turned up high

    1 small metal sheet tray

    a couple of bowls, measuring equipment, and a spoon or two

     

    Cooking with Kombucha: Banana's Brûlée with Mulberry Kombucha

    Ingredients:

    2 bananas

    1/4 c white sugar

    1/4 c hazelnuts

    2 c M-Train (Mulberry Kombucha)*

    *you can substitute with your favorite kombucha, I find it works best with black-tea based 'buch. Feel free to add a packet of our Blueberry Ginger to your 'buch for that fruity excellence.

     

    Directions:

    First things to get a jump on are toasting your hazelnuts on a small sheet tray in the oven and reducing that mulberry kombucha in a sauce pot on high heat. Roast your nuts at around 400º-450ºF for 4-5 minutes, til light brown and the skins start to flake.

     

    Cooking with Kombucha: Banana's Brûlée with Mulberry Kombucha Peeling hazelnuts after roasting

     

    Remove any excess hazelnut skin by rolling them in a clean kitchen towel, or in your hands. Then crush them with the side of a knife, and chop 'em to Ice cream Sundae chunky sprinkle size, as shown below:

     

    Cooking with Kombucha: Banana's Brûlée with Mulberry Kombucha

     

    Remember to stir your reduction! You are looking for a good syrupy consistency, something good for drizzling.

    Next Step: Brûlée Bananas!

    At this point it is important not to start the brûléed bananas if your reduction is not ready, as the sugar will slowly soften if you wait too long. Once your reduction is ready, continue with the recipe.

     

    Slice your bananas in half, lay them out on something heat resistant, like the back of a sheet tray. Then liberally sprinkle white sugar on top. Some will sink in, but re-apply more to create a great crust.

     

    May I say oh la la ! We are close - but need to focus now - the next step is important as it makes getting them out later much much easier. Free the bananas from their skins and segment them in while keeping the skin whole.

    Now all you have to do is plate! If your reduction is ready to go, so are you. Drizzle on your mulberry kombucha reduction, then hit it with the nuts - in fact go nuts, it is the only rational thing to do. Stop, smile, take a photo and post it to our Facebook and eat! Tell us what you think. :)

  • Caffeine and Kombucha, pt. 1 - Brewing Kombucha without Caffeine

     

    I'm frequently asked about caffeine and kombucha, and caffeine content of kombucha in general. This consideration has immediate repercussions for many people, such as those allergic to caffeine, to those who are very sensitive to its effects. As such, there is a lot of interest for kombucha brewers in the range of caffeine one can find in kombucha. Today I'd like to discuss the making of kombucha without, or with very little caffeine.

    Barley-Rooibos kombucha Barley-Rooibos kombucha

    *Contrary to some opinions I've heard, it has been verified that caffeine content in kombucha does not decrease during fermentation.* (from Michael Roussin's "Analyses of Kombucha Ferments," a great paper that can be found here)

     

    **The kombucha recipe Kombucha Brooklyn provides, and that we brew with, calls for 3/4 less dry tea than does the same amount of tea you would drink, say at 2pm with snacks. That means 3/4 less caffeine than a standard cup of tea.**

     

    Firstly, I'd like to provide a disclaimer. One of the major tenets of KBBK philosophy holds that kombucha brewed without tea (camellia sinensis) will not always reliably change from sweet to fermented, and if it does, you will find it very difficult to sustain a culture on these tisanes, herbal teas, or otherwise. Whereas you can usually get one or two ferments successfully, at most, from non-tea containing brews (grape juice, coconut water with pineapple, barley and rooibos), you will not be able to sustain a SCOBY with these seemingly normal foods that are actually alien to your culture.

     

    Shu-mee White tea, left; Silver Bud white tea, right Shu-mee White tea, left; Silver Bud white tea, right; great for making tea-based kombucha - but not actually low in caffeine

    As I sat pondering this issue, I started to consider other fermented beverages with foods that provide a good nutrient profile suitable for feeding yeast. My first thought was beer; then I remembered something my co-worker Anna had brought in to our office, that we enjoyed immensely when steeped as a tea - roasted barley. Bingo! I wanted to brew a kombucha that had greatly reduced caffeine, and it seemed barley might be the key. Another of my favorite alterna-"tea"ves, rooibos, came to me as the next best herb to use in this caffeine-free kombucha admixture. Said to have been cultivated by Dutch settlers of South Africa as a replacement for black tea (then a prohibitively expensive prospect for import), rooibos has become a popular facet of South African culture.

     

    Barley, left; Rooibos, right Barley, left; Rooibos, right

    I was relatively sure that a combination of barley and rooibos would ferment just fine into kombucha. As I've been experimenting with many different herbal additions to traditional kombucha teas (which have been pretty much anything camellia sinensis), and discovered that the culture is relatively resilient to such experimentation, I figured diving in head-first would be both fun and informative.

     

    I would call the results highly successful. To fully ferment took about 10 days, when I reached a nice balance of sweetness and acidity, and I was left with a kombucha that had a very malty and tart cherry flavor. Rooibos, tasting a lot like an herbal cherry, undoubtedly was the most forward of the flavors in this brew. My SCOBY wasn't anything substantial, about 2 mm thick, but the 'buch was definitely 'buch. And since I have an essentially unlimited supply of SCOBYs, I wasn't worried about keeping a culture going feeding on this simple, tea-free brew.

     

    The longevity of your culture will however be a great concern to you, the home brewer. You will be able to use your initial, "seed SCOBY" multiple times, but your caffeine-free brew may not produce a nice, thick SCOBY every time you brew, as camellia sinensis is the best food for kombucha. As such, I suggest keeping a container in your refrigerator full of SCOBYs, like the one seen below. You'll want to keep it covered to prevent drying, but each time you have a nice new SCOBY, consider putting it in the refrigerator to keep it as a backup. That way, you won't have to count on your caffeine-free brew producing a SCOBY every week, as you'll have plenty, and this brew won't kill off your original "seed SCOBY" necessarily, it just won't produce a new one.

     

    Collection of SCOBYs as backup Collection of SCOBYs as backup; cover with a lid and store in the refrigerator indefinitely!

     

    So, keep these possibilities in mind when you make your next batch, and also remember that experimentation is the spice of kombucha brewing. You may very well find many different mixtures that work for you that don't include caffeine or tea!

     

    Stay tuned - in my next blog, I'll go over making caffeinated and energetic kombucha that will have you jumping for jitter-free joy!

  • Kombucha with a Kick: Brewing Kombucha Wine Pt. 2

     

    Welcome back! It's been awhile since part 1, hasn't it?

     

    Well, to be honest, my brew didn't go exactly as planned. A couple of my wines had a really hard time getting fermentation underway, and some started bubbling the airlock right off the bat. But really, all of them took quite a bit longer than I had expected!

     

    To start, I'll touch on the alcohol issue with kombucha. We're trying to do wine since kombucha alone will not inherently or with time make an alcoholic beverage that is palatable and appreciably alcoholic. I get that question sometimes - "If I let my kombucha brew for 3 months, will I end up with alcohol?" The answer is no - you might get a 'buch that is over 2% ABV, but this won't always be palatable and will be similar to vinegar, if you let it sit for that long. As such, we're going to force anaerobic fermentation, using a 1 gallon glass carboy, champagne yeast, and an airlock.

     

    Let's take a look at the different brews I started back in October 2013.

     

    Heavenly Peak Pu-erh - Pomegranate Kombucha Wine

     

    Meng Hai Heavenly Peak Pu-erh Meng Hai Heavenly Peak Pu-erh

     

     

    Pu-erh teas are a fun way to experiment with kombucha. You're guaranteed a finished product that is almost always different from what you expected - even if you know what you are getting into in having a good grasp of the pu-erh's flavor profile, there will be aspects that are accentuated or forgotten in the final brew.

     

    Heavenly Peak Pu-Erh / Pomegranate Kombucha Wine Heavenly Peak Pu-Erh / Pomegranate Kombucha Wine

    My pu-erh pomegranate wine is no exception. Sure, I expected a strong body and an appreciable acetic acid note with pomegranate early on. Something I've noticed that happens with kombucha wine, however, is that there's an abundant yeastiness that is not always seen as a good thing when you taste it in a wine. I've lost a lot of the notes of the initial, cooked pu-erh, picked up a ton of pomegranate and yeasty characteristics, and an easily-detected alcoholic aspect. And after about 2 months of secondary fermentation under an airlock, followed by almost 6 months of being stored in the refrigerator, not much has changed. A success, yes - it's definitely alcoholic - but I'm reminded that I'm a novice at making 'buch wine, as there isn't much about this one that is supremely desirable. Acidic, alcoholic, pomegranate barnyard. Fascinating, for sure, but I'm calling this one a pu-error.

     

    Hairy Crab Oolong - Papaya Kombucha Wine

     

    Oolong/papaya kombucha wine Hairy Crab Oolong / Papaya Kombucha Wine

     

    This one sounds silly, but aside from some initial difficulty in getting fermentation underway, there wasn't anything undersirable about this one. It was clear very early on that something wasn't quite right. I did 1/2 gallon of two different brews with this one, one pasteurized before adding the yeast, and one not pasteurized before the secondary, anaerobic fermentation. I wanted to see what effect killing off all of the probiotics in the kombucha had on the final wine.

     

    Once fermentation started (after about 3 weeks, mind you - you will be able to tell because your air lock will be bubbling), I allowed this one quite a bit of time to undergo fermentation. After about 6 weeks, I could tell from tasting that there was still more to go, and ended up calling it off after about 3 months. This is the point where I found the 'buch wine to taste best - within the first few days after the champagne yeast fermentation. The longer the wine sat in bottles, the more bread and yeast notes contributed to its flavor profile.

     

    Upon tasting, I could tell that there was still quite a bit of sweetness from the papaya, but there was a marked acidity and alcoholic nature to the brew as well. The pasteurized version definitely had a cleaner, less sulfuric aspect to it. Also, there was no overreaching, bready aspect as there had been in the pu-erh pomegranate 'buch. Lower in alcohol content than the pu-erh, but quite a bit more delicious. I call this one a success.

     

    Consider this fine oolong for your first kombucha wine journey - a nice Tieguanyin Oolong, medium oxidized Consider this fine oolong for your first kombucha wine journey - a nice Tieguanyin Oolong, medium oxidized

     

    How to Make Kombucha Wine

     

    I'll bet you've been sitting on that champagne yeast for quite a while, eh? Well hopefully by now you've honed your kombucha craft and are ready to take it to the next level with a wine. Most yeast packets you find at brew shops contain 5 grams, and are intended for a 5 gallon brew. So, just use the 1 gram of yeast per gallon you're going to make. You'll want to dissolve the yeast in some warm water before mixing it with your kombucha, that way it's nicely dispersed throughout the fermentation vessel.

     

    As for the kombucha, my methodology was to cease primary fermentation while the 'buch is still slightly sweet, in an effort to minimize any strange acidic notes I might not want in the final wine brew. I also added sugar to the 'buch, after dissolving it in warm water so I didn't have to heat up my kombucha. If you're interested in trying this method with pasteurized kombucha, go ahead and boil your brew and add the sugar so that it will dissolve nicely. I used 1 cup of sugar per gallon of wine I was going to brew, to be sure the yeast had plenty of food to metabolize into alcohol.

     

    Wine usually features some type of fruit, and so did this one. Utilizing organic papaya and organic pomegranate concentrates served this purpose; also, the sugar and other nutrients in the juices will be additional food for the yeast. The sweetness, flavor and consistency of your fruit juice will likely vary from mine, but I used 6 ounces of concentrate per 1 gallon brew. Keep in mind this is a matter of preference and you should probably err on the side of more concentrate rather than less.

     

    After pouring the fruit concentrates into my designated carboys, I added the warm yeast-water. Then, I poured the kombucha into the carboy, capped with airlocks, labeled them, and let them sit until the airlock's bubbling ceased.

     

    Airlock Airlock

     

    Now for the hard part - waiting. Try not to let this part bother you! One of the great things about kombucha in general is the speed with which this ferment is ready to be consumed. But if you want to take your brewing repertoire to the next level, it's going to take a little patience.

     

    So, get another 'buch brew going, put a wine reminder in your calendar (start tasting when almost all bubbling has ceased), and relish that day in the semi-distant future when your fruity, dry 'buch wine is boozy and bodacious!

  • Watermelon Kombucha Salad with Ajo Blanco

     

     

    Watermelon Salad with Ajo Blanco (Spanish White Gaspacho) and kombucha

    Will Donnelly | June 2014
    Watermelon Salad with Kombucha Ajo Blanco

     

    Yield: 8

    This bountiful salad is a wonderful Spanish / American cuisine blend that I recently created and would love to share. Ajo Blanco is a very old-school Spanish chilled garlic and almond soup. It's rich and creamy, though inexpensive and dairy-free. Usually this Gaspacho is served with green grapes or melon, which gives this blended soup pops of crisp crunchy texture and ever-so sweet grape fragrance, which is what got me thinking about watermelon. Start by making your Ajo Blanco, as you will need to cool it in the fridge before serving. If you are up for it, let it stand overnight in the fridge to really get the flavors working

    Ingredients

    Ajo Blanco

    • 225 grams blanched almonds (roughly a cup)
    • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and cored
    • 75 grams good white bread or stale baguette soaked in water
    • 750ml (3+ Cups) Iced water
    • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • 3 tablespoons Sherry Vinegar
    • salt and pepper to taste

     

    Watermelon Salad

    • 1/8th large watermelon
    • 1 washed cucumber
    • 1 juicy tomato
    • 1/2 bunch cilantro
    • 2 tablespoons kombucha vinegar (long fermented kombucha)
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • salt and pepper to taste

    Directions

    Start by making your Ajo Blanco, as you will need to cool it in the fridge before serving. If you are up for it, leave it in the fridge overnight  to really let the flavors meld.

    Ajo Blanco:

    1. Blend your almonds in a food processor until they are as quite fine (3-4 minutes). You may need to push them back into the bowl with a rubber spatula as they clump and climb up the sides.
    2. slowly add 1/3 cup of the iced water into the food processor.
    3. Squeeze the bread of excess water and add to the mix.
    4. At this point, add your garlic. If you have a mortar and pestle, use it! Mash your garlic with a bit of salt into a frothy pulp, then add to the soup.
    5. Add the vinegar and the olive oil, salt and pepper, and the rest of the water.
    6. If there is too much water for your mixer, you can transfer the soup into a large bowl and stir in the rest with your spatula there.
    7. Be aware that the bread may make the soup quite stodgy. If it is so, keep adding ice water until the soup is nappe consistency, or just thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.
    8. reserve and cool in the fridge.

     

    Watermelon Salad:

    1. Peel stripes off your cucumber leaving some skin in tact.
    2. Cut the cucumber in half, and dice it as finely as possible. Add to a small mixing bowl.
    3. Take the other half, stand it up on your cutting board, and carefully cut a long, skinny, angular wedge. Then rotate the cucumber a bit and make the same angled cut. Continue to do this (imagine you are carving a large cucumber spear) until you have no more cucumber. This process is very similar to a roll cut or angled roll cut. Place this cucumber into separate medium mixing bowl.
    4. Wipe down your cutting board, then halve and core your tomato. Fine dice the entire thing and transfer into the small mixing bowl.
    5. Now cut the watermelon into 1.5 inch slices, and clean it of the rind and any white pith. take your end wedge (smallest piece), small dice and add to the rest of the finely diced mix.
    6. Add salt, pepper, 1 Tbsp 'buch vinegar (if you don't have 'buch vinegar you can use champagne or white vinegar) and 1Tbsp olive oil to the small mixing bowl and give it a quick toss.
    7. Take the remaining watermelon pieces and cut off long 'shingles', about a centimeter thick. This will give you a nice piece of watermelon where you can get to the seeds and remove them, and then cut it into long, angular wedges. Add this to the medium mixing bowl.
    8. Add the rest of the 'buch vinegar and olive oil to your medium mixing bowl and lightly toss with a bit of salt and pepper.

    Final Steps

    1. Wash, dry and pluck your cilantro into large plushes.
    2. Pour your Ajo Blanco into your serving bowl (s)
    3. Spoon on top your small dice mix, then arrange your large-cut mix ontop, vertically.
    4. Finish with sprinking your cilantro on top!
    5. Enjoy the taste of summer :)

     

  • Pomegranate-Kombucha Apple Sauce

    Afternoon y'alls! It's been blowing a two-foot-deep tundra sideways here, and it's time to offset this bone biting chill with some GOOD FOOD! So lets get started on some mind blowing Pomegranate-Kombucha Apple Sauce, perfect with cracked oatmeal and homemade yogurt.

    DSC_5367

     

     

     

    Time required: 3-4 Hours (pot watching mostly)

    Other requirements: Pomegranate-Kombucha (see below)

    Difficulty: Easy / Medium

     

    Note- you can start your apple sauce with the pomegranate kombucha first, and then add the caramel later when you've finished it. This may shorten the time required.

    Ingredients:

    • 12-15 Apples, preferably Honey Crisps
    • 2 Cups of Pomegranate-Kombucha (optional until you try it with. :)
    • 1 Cup White Sugar
    • 3 Cups Water
    • 1 tsp (teaspoon) Salt
    • 1 tbsp Cinnamon
    • 1 tbsp Ground ginger
    • 1 tbsp Allspice
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    •  1/2 tsp clove
    • love

    Instructions:

     

    Pomegranate-Kombucha: Makes  2 Quarts +

    Follow our instructions here for 1/2 Gallon our Basic, Straight-Up Kombucha.

    Depending on your judgement on their flavor, and final amount of juice, add either 1.6 fluid ounces of Pomegranate Concentrate (found at health food stores, organic is best) OR  juice from a freshly squeezed pomegranate, to your now finished kombucha. Reserve 2 cups of Pom-'Buch for this recipe.

     

    Caramel Syrup: Read through before starting

    DSC_5358DSC_5361DSC_5362DSC_5365

    • Please: take any and all necessary precaution with any syrup production, as this stuff gets really hot.
    • Add 1 cup of sugar to a (very important) SQUEAKY CLEAN and DRY sauce pot.
    • Boil 2 Cups water in a kettle or separate pot while you ...
    • Turn heat to Med-High, and let your sugar start to melt.
    • Once your sugar melts, with a metal whisk (or spoon as I forgot mine), whisk any left over sugar clumps to make a uniform syrup.
    • You will now cook the syrup until it goes a medium orange / brown, and then turn off the heat so that after cooling, your syrup will be a lovely and deep caramel color.
    • As its still bubbling and cooling off, add your 2 Cups of boiling water all at once and WHISK! Beware: this is hot enough to scald you so be careful! Do not add the water too slowly because the sugar will vaporize a small amount of water and splatter it on you, where as if it all goes in at once, it will cool down the sugar much quicker and make this a safer operation.
    • Did you do it? Well Done! Pat yourself on the back. Now onto..

    The Apple Sauce

    • Quickly rinse and peel any stickers off your Apples, then pat dry with a cloth.
    • Cut the Apples in half vertically, then vertically half again.
    • with a small pairing knife, core out the quarter slices.DSC_5366
    • Small dice your apples.
    • Place your Apple dice into a pot with at least 2-3 inches space at the top.
    • Add all your spices and salt, Caramel Syrup, and 2 Cups of Pomegranate Kombucha to the pot and give a good stir.
    • Cook on Medium Heat until soft, then low for as long as it takes to cook the residual liquid off.

     

    You've finished your Pomegranate-Kombucha Apple Sauce! Well done. I love it on its own, or as pictured above on top of cracked oatmeal porridge with a dollop of yogurt and sliced apple.

    -Will Donnelly

     

  • An Introduction to Cooking with Kombucha

     

    As this is the first of many posts I will write about food, cooking and kombucha, I thought it may be enriching for the reader to understand more about what food is and has made us, where what we know has come from, and why we eat what we eat now.

     

    Food, in its simplicity is what nourishes our biological needs, stoking the fire so that we may be so lucky as to spend our time pursuing dreams and attending other needs. What we now enjoy as food comes a long way from its wild, dangerous and unmapped origins. A Chicken-Parm Hero really is haute cuisine when you think about it, but times have changed and along with it our palates, our expectations.

     

    When cooking, one manipulates food so we can either enjoy it or digest it better. It quickly becomes apparent that knowledge of chemistry, biology and technique is going to help you greatly in this vast world of crafting a meal. Attempting to put out an oil fire with water, eating the wrong mushroom, rubbing an eye after cutting peppers are mistakes not soon made again. And although edible, over seasoning, under cooking and burning your food are all roads best not taken. So, we have to understand our food; a process that has happened at times only long after we have made it. Ceviche, dried meats, curing onions or smoked salmon are all things that worked, and only later when we had the time after a lush meal to think why, did we figure it out.

     

    Over hundreds of thousands of years our bodies have adapted to cooked food. It has been evolutionarily advantageous not to spend your energy chewing and digesting, but changing what you eat so that it may better feed you. When you marinate a steak, acids help break down the fats and proteins. As you place it on a seasoned grill, the intense heat denatures the protein further. It also helps make the food safer, killing off surface bacteria.  This allows us to get the most out of our food as we absorb nutrition from broken down proteins or fibers much, much better. It is why we cook, and why we have to cook.

     

    Kombucha, among many things, is an acid.

                                                              Cook your Kombucha!

     

    Generally it is a tart and slightly fizzy, not much unlike a cider or champagne. Fermenting different teas, for different periods of time, and finishing the process with fruits or other flavorings all alter the unique flavor. The range of terroirs, ambient temperatures, water composition, and handling techniques of Chinese and Japanese tea gives kombucha a large palette to paint with. If you can take all that into consideration, the kombucha you can brew is vast. What you can do with that brew is even more varied – why not marinate your favorite grilled goods with a rich and tangy black tea kombucha vinegar reduction? Or let a mango slaw sit in a peachy white tea kombucha overnight? This light ferment will alter the flavors just a bit, and may impart just the right fragrance. Yum!

     

    I've cooked for many years, and with most things, it is easiest to start simple. Don't worry about the above mentioned terroirs or water composition of where your tea comes from. Most palates don't ever even taste the difference, and if you are cooking it later, that nuance may not even be apparent. Instead, start with kombucha vinegar! Most of us end up making it because we forget to tend to our brew - so instead of throwing it away, substitute your apple cider or white vinegars with your new tea vinegar. Again, kombucha can be a great component for a marinade, or even a ceviçhe. Once you feel comfortable with that, why not reduce it, touch it up with sugar and drizzle it over green tea ice cream? There are many, many possibilities for an adventurous cook when it comes to cooking with kombucha. And we haven't even begun to talk about working with the culture itself!

     

    For some recipes to get you started, take a look here - http://www.kombuchabrooklyn.com/cooking-with-kombucha

     

    If you have any suggestions or questions please drop us a comment and I'll try to answer as best I can. - Will

  • Kombucha Cocktails - An Untapped Nexus

     by Billy Stewart

     

    We find ourselves in an interesting period of time. A time where information has become so prevalent that its inflated value is close to 0. The gap has been exponentially widening between information, knowledge and wisdom.

     

    As a result, many of us find ourselves turning to old traditions. Things that have survived the test of time. And thanks to this surge in information, once-lost processes are being reclaimed, dusted off and thrown into a new sea. And to float, it must be inflated with an air of enchantment, meaning, purpose.

     Kombucha cocktail

    What gets my oars rowing is consumable goods. I want to travel to distant lands with my palate, on the sails of fermentation, unlocking compounds hidden beneath the surface.

     

    Where so much is not real, I need something that I can taste, smell, feel, and vice versa. It should tell a story of the way things used to be; or the way things could still be, yet never were. I want to heighten my senses, and alter my perception. I am looking to experience a symphony of ethereal flavor.

     

    This is a call to those who craft such tangible commodities. People who have devoted a large portion of their professional life (discovered their vocation) to making something real, whether used for pleasure or health. But in my mind, that is a fine line not worth debating. Instead I would like to marry the two with Reverse Toxmosis. Change the future, because it is nothing; as it has not yet occurred. I cannot do it for you, but I will provide the platform. Kombucha cocktails. So backwards that it is upside down.

     

    Reverse Toxmosis

     

    4 oz straight up

    4 oz Kølsh

     

    mix, sip, repeat

     

    Bruchelada

     

    4 oz straight up

    4 oz gaffel kolsh

    2 oz kombucha breath of fire

    salt rim

    lime garnish

     

    rim, blend, garnish, sip at your own risk

     

    Jasmine Margarita

     

    2 oz tequila

    1 oz triple sec

    ½ oz simple syrup

    3 oz Jasmine Green Kombucha

    salt rim (optional)

    lime garnish

     

    a low calorie, delicious alternative to traditional margaritas

    You will be asking your local bartender for Kombucha in all of your Margaritas

     

    Hail Mary

     

    2 oz tequila

    2 oz kombucha breath of fire

    4 oz McClure’s Bloody Mary Mix

    kombucha vinegar pickled veg garnish

    *please enjoy all alcoholic cocktails at your own risk

    Non Alcoholic options

     

    Kombujito

     

    muddled mint, simple syrup, and lime zest

    6 oz Jasmine Green Kombucha

    strained over crushed ice

  • Probiotic Salsa

     

    Feed this to your guests at your next summer party and watch how well every one gets along. This recipe is truly delicious in its simple form, but if you want to have a thrilling night, throw in some grilled corn or pineapple and watch your party Komblossom.

     

     

    Ingredients for Jessica Child's Probiotic Salsa

     

    • 5 Tomatoes, 4 of them chopped*
    • ½ cup pineapple or 1 ear of corn (optional)
    • 1 Onions, chopped
    • 1 clove Garlic, finely chopped
    • ½ bunch Cilantro, chopped
    • ½ cup Kombucha Culture, chopped
    • 1 Lime
    • 2 Whole Jalapeno Peppers
    • Salt
    • Pepper

     

    Directions

     

      1. Roast the jalapeno. It’s summer, so you might have a grill going. If so, plop your peppers on your hot grill and rotate until all sides are charred. If you are doing this on your stove, find a way to safely and securely hold your pepper either by skewering it, or holding it with a pair of tongs. Hold the pepper close to the burner or flame and rotate as necessary until all sides are charred. Once your pepper cools down, it will be easy to peel off most of the charred skin leaving behind the soft and smoky pepper flesh. Remove the seeds and finely chop the flesh.
      2. Put the chopped tomatoes into a nice bowl. Once this salsa is complete, you won’t have time to transfer it to your serving dish before it starts getting gobbled up--it’s that awesome. Add three quarters of all ingredients except the jalapenos and limes. Taste. Adjust any of these ingredients as needed.
      3. Add 1/4 of the jalapenos you’ve chopped. They can be sneaky so add them slowly. Once you have settled on the right heat, add lime squeezes until you acquire the perfect balance.
      4. Devour with chips or soft warm tortillas.
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