Recipes

  • Pomegranate-Kombucha Apple Sauce

    Afternoon y'alls! It's been blowing a two-foot-deep tundra sideways here, and it's time to offset this bone biting chill with some GOOD FOOD! So lets get started on some mind blowing Pomegranate-Kombucha Apple Sauce, perfect with cracked oatmeal and homemade yogurt.

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    Time required: 3-4 Hours (pot watching mostly)

    Other requirements: Pomegranate-Kombucha (see below)

    Difficulty: Easy / Medium

     

    Note- you can start your apple sauce with the pomegranate kombucha first, and then add the caramel later when you've finished it. This may shorten the time required.

    Ingredients:

    • 12-15 Apples, preferably Honey Crisps
    • 2 Cups of Pomegranate-Kombucha (optional until you try it with. :)
    • 1 Cup White Sugar
    • 3 Cups Water
    • 1 tsp (teaspoon) Salt
    • 1 tbsp Cinnamon
    • 1 tbsp Ground ginger
    • 1 tbsp Allspice
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    •  1/2 tsp clove
    • love

    Instructions:

     

    Pomegranate-Kombucha: Makes  2 Quarts +

    Follow our instructions here for 1/2 Gallon our Basic, Straight-Up Kombucha.

    Depending on your judgement on their flavor, and final amount of juice, add either 1.6 fluid ounces of Pomegranate Concentrate (found at health food stores, organic is best) OR  juice from a freshly squeezed pomegranate, to your now finished kombucha. Reserve 2 cups of Pom-'Buch for this recipe.

     

    Caramel Syrup: Read through before starting

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    • Please: take any and all necessary precaution with any syrup production, as this stuff gets really hot.
    • Add 1 cup of sugar to a (very important) SQUEAKY CLEAN and DRY sauce pot.
    • Boil 2 Cups water in a kettle or separate pot while you ...
    • Turn heat to Med-High, and let your sugar start to melt.
    • Once your sugar melts, with a metal whisk (or spoon as I forgot mine), whisk any left over sugar clumps to make a uniform syrup.
    • You will now cook the syrup until it goes a medium orange / brown, and then turn off the heat so that after cooling, your syrup will be a lovely and deep caramel color.
    • As its still bubbling and cooling off, add your 2 Cups of boiling water all at once and WHISK! Beware: this is hot enough to scald you so be careful! Do not add the water too slowly because the sugar will vaporize a small amount of water and splatter it on you, where as if it all goes in at once, it will cool down the sugar much quicker and make this a safer operation.
    • Did you do it? Well Done! Pat yourself on the back. Now onto..

    The Apple Sauce

    • Quickly rinse and peel any stickers off your Apples, then pat dry with a cloth.
    • Cut the Apples in half vertically, then vertically half again.
    • with a small pairing knife, core out the quarter slices.DSC_5366
    • Small dice your apples.
    • Place your Apple dice into a pot with at least 2-3 inches space at the top.
    • Add all your spices and salt, Caramel Syrup, and 2 Cups of Pomegranate Kombucha to the pot and give a good stir.
    • Cook on Medium Heat until soft, then low for as long as it takes to cook the residual liquid off.

     

    You've finished your Pomegranate-Kombucha Apple Sauce! Well done. I love it on its own, or as pictured above on top of cracked oatmeal porridge with a dollop of yogurt and sliced apple.

    -Will Donnelly

     

  • An Introduction to Cooking with Kombucha

     

    As this is the first of many posts I will write about food, cooking and kombucha, I thought it may be enriching for the reader to understand more about what food is and has made us, where what we know has come from, and why we eat what we eat now.

     

    Food, in its simplicity is what nourishes our biological needs, stoking the fire so that we may be so lucky as to spend our time pursuing dreams and attending other needs. What we now enjoy as food comes a long way from its wild, dangerous and unmapped origins. A Chicken-Parm Hero really is haute cuisine when you think about it, but times have changed and along with it our palates, our expectations.

     

    When cooking, one manipulates food so we can either enjoy it or digest it better. It quickly becomes apparent that knowledge of chemistry, biology and technique is going to help you greatly in this vast world of crafting a meal. Attempting to put out an oil fire with water, eating the wrong mushroom, rubbing an eye after cutting peppers are mistakes not soon made again. And although edible, over seasoning, under cooking and burning your food are all roads best not taken. So, we have to understand our food; a process that has happened at times only long after we have made it. Ceviche, dried meats, curing onions or smoked salmon are all things that worked, and only later when we had the time after a lush meal to think why, did we figure it out.

     

    Over hundreds of thousands of years our bodies have adapted to cooked food. It has been evolutionarily advantageous not to spend your energy chewing and digesting, but changing what you eat so that it may better feed you. When you marinate a steak, acids help break down the fats and proteins. As you place it on a seasoned grill, the intense heat denatures the protein further. It also helps make the food safer, killing off surface bacteria.  This allows us to get the most out of our food as we absorb nutrition from broken down proteins or fibers much, much better. It is why we cook, and why we have to cook.

     

    Kombucha, among many things, is an acid.

                                                              Cook your Kombucha!

     

    Generally it is a tart and slightly fizzy, not much unlike a cider or champagne. Fermenting different teas, for different periods of time, and finishing the process with fruits or other flavorings all alter the unique flavor. The range of terroirs, ambient temperatures, water composition, and handling techniques of Chinese and Japanese tea gives kombucha a large palette to paint with. If you can take all that into consideration, the kombucha you can brew is vast. What you can do with that brew is even more varied – why not marinate your favorite grilled goods with a rich and tangy black tea kombucha vinegar reduction? Or let a mango slaw sit in a peachy white tea kombucha overnight? This light ferment will alter the flavors just a bit, and may impart just the right fragrance. Yum!

     

    I've cooked for many years, and with most things, it is easiest to start simple. Don't worry about the above mentioned terroirs or water composition of where your tea comes from. Most palates don't ever even taste the difference, and if you are cooking it later, that nuance may not even be apparent. Instead, start with kombucha vinegar! Most of us end up making it because we forget to tend to our brew - so instead of throwing it away, substitute your apple cider or white vinegars with your new tea vinegar. Again, kombucha can be a great component for a marinade, or even a ceviçhe. Once you feel comfortable with that, why not reduce it, touch it up with sugar and drizzle it over green tea ice cream? There are many, many possibilities for an adventurous cook when it comes to cooking with kombucha. And we haven't even begun to talk about working with the culture itself!

     

    For some recipes to get you started, take a look here - http://www.kombuchabrooklyn.com/cooking-with-kombucha

     

    If you have any suggestions or questions please drop us a comment and I'll try to answer as best I can. - Will

  • Kombucha Cocktails - An Untapped Nexus

     by Billy Stewart

     

    We find ourselves in an interesting period of time. A time where information has become so prevalent that its inflated value is close to 0. The gap has been exponentially widening between information, knowledge and wisdom.

     

    As a result, many of us find ourselves turning to old traditions. Things that have survived the test of time. And thanks to this surge in information, once-lost processes are being reclaimed, dusted off and thrown into a new sea. And to float, it must be inflated with an air of enchantment, meaning, purpose.

     Kombucha cocktail

    What gets my oars rowing is consumable goods. I want to travel to distant lands with my palate, on the sails of fermentation, unlocking compounds hidden beneath the surface.

     

    Where so much is not real, I need something that I can taste, smell, feel, and vice versa. It should tell a story of the way things used to be; or the way things could still be, yet never were. I want to heighten my senses, and alter my perception. I am looking to experience a symphony of ethereal flavor.

     

    This is a call to those who craft such tangible commodities. People who have devoted a large portion of their professional life (discovered their vocation) to making something real, whether used for pleasure or health. But in my mind, that is a fine line not worth debating. Instead I would like to marry the two with Reverse Toxmosis. Change the future, because it is nothing; as it has not yet occurred. I cannot do it for you, but I will provide the platform. Kombucha cocktails. So backwards that it is upside down.

     

    Reverse Toxmosis

     

    4 oz straight up

    4 oz Kølsh

     

    mix, sip, repeat

     

    Bruchelada

     

    4 oz straight up

    4 oz gaffel kolsh

    2 oz kombucha breath of fire

    salt rim

    lime garnish

     

    rim, blend, garnish, sip at your own risk

     

    Jasmine Margarita

     

    2 oz tequila

    1 oz triple sec

    ½ oz simple syrup

    3 oz Jasmine Green Kombucha

    salt rim (optional)

    lime garnish

     

    a low calorie, delicious alternative to traditional margaritas

    You will be asking your local bartender for Kombucha in all of your Margaritas

     

    Hail Mary

     

    2 oz tequila

    2 oz kombucha breath of fire

    4 oz McClure’s Bloody Mary Mix

    kombucha vinegar pickled veg garnish

    *please enjoy all alcoholic cocktails at your own risk

    Non Alcoholic options

     

    Kombujito

     

    muddled mint, simple syrup, and lime zest

    6 oz Jasmine Green Kombucha

    strained over crushed ice

  • Probiotic Salsa

     

    Feed this to your guests at your next summer party and watch how well every one gets along. This recipe is truly delicious in its simple form, but if you want to have a thrilling night, throw in some grilled corn or pineapple and watch your party Komblossom.

     

     

    Ingredients for Jessica Child's Probiotic Salsa

     

    • 5 Tomatoes, 4 of them chopped*
    • ½ cup pineapple or 1 ear of corn (optional)
    • 1 Onions, chopped
    • 1 clove Garlic, finely chopped
    • ½ bunch Cilantro, chopped
    • ½ cup Kombucha Culture, chopped
    • 1 Lime
    • 2 Whole Jalapeno Peppers
    • Salt
    • Pepper

     

    Directions

     

      1. Roast the jalapeno. It’s summer, so you might have a grill going. If so, plop your peppers on your hot grill and rotate until all sides are charred. If you are doing this on your stove, find a way to safely and securely hold your pepper either by skewering it, or holding it with a pair of tongs. Hold the pepper close to the burner or flame and rotate as necessary until all sides are charred. Once your pepper cools down, it will be easy to peel off most of the charred skin leaving behind the soft and smoky pepper flesh. Remove the seeds and finely chop the flesh.
      2. Put the chopped tomatoes into a nice bowl. Once this salsa is complete, you won’t have time to transfer it to your serving dish before it starts getting gobbled up--it’s that awesome. Add three quarters of all ingredients except the jalapenos and limes. Taste. Adjust any of these ingredients as needed.
      3. Add 1/4 of the jalapenos you’ve chopped. They can be sneaky so add them slowly. Once you have settled on the right heat, add lime squeezes until you acquire the perfect balance.
      4. Devour with chips or soft warm tortillas.
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