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Monthly Archives: May 2015

  • Kombucha Recipe: Ruby Daydream

     

    Ruby Daydream, Kombucha Brooklyn

     

    One of the funnest things about summer time is the refreshments! We're always trying to think outside the box, and in this kombucha recipe there's no exception. In honor of the coming summer, here's a great brew to turn the proverbial heads of friends and family that is sure to please on those warm, sunny occasions!

     

    Ruby Daydream

    For a 1-gallon brew:

     

    1. Steep the following for at least 20 minutes in 32 oz freshly-boiled water:

     

    2. After removing the leaves and lavender from the infusion, add:

    • 1 cup sugar (stir to dissolve)
    • 64 oz (1/2 gallon) cool, filtered water
    • 1 cup already-brewed kombucha (or 3 TBSP white vinegar)
    • SCOBY

     

    3. Top the brew off with water so that the surface of the liquid is just below the neck of your vessel.

     

    4. Cover your brew jar with a cloth and rubber band. Allow the brew to ferment for 5-10 days. Be sure to taste it every day after 5 days!

     

    5. Once you have a nice balance of sweetness and acidity, your brew is ready for secondary fermentation. Now, you'll need three more ingredients:

    • 5 grams dried (or fresh!) hops (pellet or whole-cone) such as Cascade
    • 1 cup boiling water
    • juice from (1) ruby red grapefruit (~ 1 cup)

     

    6. Place hops into a nylon mesh bag or tea ball and submerge into the boiling water. Allow to steep for 5 minutes, remove hops, and allow to cool

     

    7. Siphon or pour off your kombucha into your filling vessel - this can be a tea pitcher, another brew jar, etc.; this is the jar from which you will fill your bottles. Be sure to retain 1 cup of brewed kombucha for your next batch.

     

    8. Once the hop-tea is cooled, you can add it to your filling vessel, along with the grapefruit juice.

     

    9. Stir the contents of your jar, fill into glass bottles and one plastic bottle (so you can tell how much pressure builds up).

     

    10. Allow to sit at room temperature until the plastic bottle has built up a good amount of pressure, indicating that your glass bottles will be carbonated (read here about secondary fermentation). Generally this will take 1-2 weeks, but this step is also totally optional - non-carbonated kombucha is delicious too! Place the bottles into the refrigerator and share once they've cooled.

    Optional: Steep a little bit of hibiscus and add it to your brew for secondary fermentation. This is a great way to add a little color to any brew!

    Once your bottles are ready to drink, pop one open and put your feet up! You deserve some time to sit back with this refresher. This is a good time to start daydreaming about your next brew!

  • Choosing a Brewing Vessel

     

    Ceramic kombucha crocks, Kombucha Brooklyn

    While it's easy to brew kombucha in pretty much any container, it's an important decision to choose the best vessel you can find. Choosing a brewing vessel can make a huge difference in the quality, and of course quantity, of your kombucha brew. So, in an effort to clarify a few things for brewers new or seasoned, read below to find out more about these essential instruments.

     

    In choosing your brewing vessel, look for a few key characteristics:

     

    Stainless steel pot, Kombucha Brooklyn

     

    1. The vessel should be glassceramic, stainless steel (304 or brewer grade, not cooking grade) or wood. While many will say that food-grade plastic can be used, undesirable flavors often result from continued use of plastic. Glass is an inert material and will not allow the leaching of chemicals into your brew. If brewing in a ceramic vessel, be sure it is lead-free (the crocks that KBBK carries are lead-free and USA-made). Stainless steel is especially popular in commercial brewing environments and as such will work for home brewing as well. Some choose to brew in wooden barrels, which is also fine, and will contribute woody characteristics to your brew.
    2. The vessel should be wide-mouthed. The kombucha SCOBY requires that air be constantly exchanged with the outside environment, as it is constantly taking in oxygen and expelling CO2. A wide surface area ensures fast growth, as well as quick acidification of the tea. This results in a healthy culture. The wider the area for the culture to exchange gases, the more numerous are the antibacterial byproducts of SCOBY metabolism. Keep in mind that although your SCOBY will grow in tall, narrow-mouthed vessels, it will do so less vigorously.
    3. The size of the vessel is important, though not quite so much as the available surface area. Similar to the surface area, however, the more shallow the depth of liquid in the fermentation vessel, the faster the SCOBY grows and processes the tea into delicious kombucha.
    4. The shape of the vessel is a matter of personal preference, and the culture will take the shape of the container at the level of the liquid’s surface.
    5. Vessels with a spigot can be intermittently convenient but can also tend to cause headaches. While it may seem useful to use the spigot and not worry about using or cleaning an auto-siphon, or requiring precise pouring technique, brewers will find the spigot becoming periodically clogged with kombucha culture; you'll find yourself not using the spigot as frequently as you are using it.
      • Additionally, the materials from which the vessel's spigot is made could be contributing chemicals to your brew through leaching. As kombucha is very acidic, any substance that is reactive to such liquids can potentially release toxins into your brew (something interesting to consider when kombucha is a detoxifying drink). It's for precisely this reason that we advise against brewing in plastic, even BPA-free or food-grade plastic vessels.
      • An auto-siphon can be just as simple to use to extract kombucha, resists transfer of large chunks of culture, is easy to clean, and requires no relocation of the brewing vessel.

     

    Barrel, Beehive and pot, Kombucha Brooklyn

     

    Additional Considerations

     

    Ventilation is very important for your brewing vessel. Without proper ventilation, your brew's bacteria will be unable to access the oxygen they need to produce a nicely acidic kombucha. So, consider using fans in bigger brewing setups as well as completely porous (but not too porous) covers for your brewing vessel! Remember that cheese cloth is too porous and can allow fruit flies entry into your brew.

     

    Remember that it's not only kombucha that you can ferment in your vessels - pretty much any vegetable ferment (kimchi, sauerkraut) and some liquid ferments will work too - think kefir, mead, kvass etc. So, open up your horizons and start scouring flea markets, pawn shops, garage sales and antique malls for some sweet fermentation vessels!

     

  • From Urban to Ulster: KBBK Has Found Peace and Quiet

     

    KBBK's New Space, Kombucha Brooklyn

     

    Well, we've done it! KBBK has completely relocated to the beautiful Catskill mountains, on the outskirts of Kingston, NY. KBBK has found peace and quiet. While we miss the busy night life, bodega sandwiches, nearly effortless transportation and the 'buch-thirsty masses, the move has been for the best.

     

    View from Overlook Mountain, Kombucha Brooklyn View of the mountains from Overlook Mountain

     

    We're trading sirens for birdsongs, exhaust for dust, bikes for boats, and towers for trees. Not all of us grew up in a big city, so it's been a pleasant return to rural life for some, and for others an unfamiliar but welcome change of scenery and lifestyle.

     

    Echo Lake, Kombucha Brooklyn Echo Lake

     

    So, come visit us in Kingston - you'll surely be welcomed with a cold pint of kombucha when we open our retail space within the next couple of months. We might even take you on a hike or for a quick visit to the beautiful fishing lake behind our store!

     

    Onteora Fishing Lake, Kombucha Brooklyn Onteora Fishing Lake

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